Wednesday, July 22, 2015

Pursuing Lyrical and Musical Flow

What’s one thing that can make or break your effectiveness in worship leading?


Good storytellers, movie directors, public speakers, and writers learn how to flow naturally from one chapter/scene/subject to the next. Bad or nonexistent transitions can weaken otherwise good content, because the joltiness of the finished project screams a lack of cohesion. Cohesiveness – or “flow” – is a really important thing.

Worship leaders who don’t lead their congregations and musicians with a cohesive flow from one song to the next run the risk of working against themselves. Even though the songs might be good songs, without those songs being threaded and woven together, it doesn’t matter so much. There’s no clear narrative, no natural progression, and no clear big picture. It’s all a jumble of little pieces, random songs, different keys, disconnected topics, and instead of leaving a congregation saying “aha!”, it leaves them asking “huh?”

Developing a good sense of lyrical and musical flow is absolutely essential for worship leaders. Keep reading
Lyrical and musical flow are critical elements throughout the entire service, not just in the worship set at the beginning of the service. They are critical elements in traditional patterns of worship as well as in contemporary worship patterns.

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