Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Survey: Does Your Church Use the 1662 Book of Common Prayer?


I am taking a survey of Anglican churches in North America that use the classic Anglican Prayer Book—The Book of Common Prayer of 1662. If your church uses the 1662 Book of Common Prayer at any or all of its services and is located in Canada or the United States, Puerto Rico or one of the US territories, I would like to hear from you. Please leave your answers to the following questions in the comments section below.

• What is the name of your church?
• What is the name of its current pastor? Did he introduce the use of the 1662 Prayer Book? If not, who did?
• With which ecclesial body is it affiliated? If it is affiliated with the ACNA, please also give the name of jurisdiction and the cluster, diocese, district or network to which it belongs.
• What is its location?
• What is its email address?
• Which forms of service—Morning Prayer, Litany, Holy Communion, Evening Prayer, Baptism, Confirmation, etc.—from the 1662 Prayer Book does it use and at what services?
• What other worship aids—service books, hymnals, songbooks—does your church use with the 1662 Prayer Book?
• Further comments.

Please note that churches using the Reformed Episcopal Church’s new Prayer Book—The Book of Common Prayer of 2005—are not using the 1662 Book of Common Prayer but a service book that combines elements taken from both the 1662 Prayer Book and the 1928 Prayer Book. The result is a service book that differs significantly in its theology from the 1662 Prayer Book. The purpose of this survey is to identify churches that actually use the classic Anglican Prayer Book and to learn more about them and their use of the 1662 Prayer Book. Thank you for helping with this survey.

16 comments:

aaytch said...

We are just a house "church". No ordained pastor. No affiliation. Just doing Morning and Evening Prayer on Sundays and some weekdays. Planning to expand that to "online" services someday soon.

Usually no music but we would use just about anything so long as its lyric is both Biblical and not simplistic. Occasional piano player.

Occasional lay sermon. More often a reading of a famous sermon or playing an MP3.

Location: Waxhaw NC hhbv@glimfeather.com

Comment: We are in an Anglican wasteland here with no choices but ACNA Arminian Evangelicals and hard-line Anglo-Catholics.

Robin_G_Jordan said...

J. C. Ryle's commentaries on the Gospels were written to be read aloud. They can be adapted very easily to this century, and used as sermons. They also in most cases fit with the Prayer Book lectionary. They can be shortened when they do not. The notes that accompany each chapter can be used in a discussion following the sermon.

I am planning an article on music and the Prayer Book. I will include resources that may be useful to a small church.

Don said...

Just a quick note to say that, after five years online, the 1662 BCP remains one of the most popular features of my site. So there are many fans of this, whether or not there are many churches which use it.

It's still available here (the access page changed over the summer.

Reformation said...

Robin:

Disciplined use of Morning and Evening Prayer, 24/7. 1662 BCP.

Rather than daily lections, substitute reading 10 chapters of OT and 10 chapters of NT. Rather than read the Psalms during the service, as well as the daily Psalter lections, I sing them. Use the Scots Presbyterian Psalter. Acapella singing, although can play the piano and organ.

No church here. AMiA sixty miles north. ACC in town, but stopped going last month...saint invocation, and other matters, like the Iker, Schofield, Ackerman, Hewitt, and other SSC-crowd. Not going to support anti-Reformationists.

Location: Camp Lejeune, NC, or more technically, Jacksonville, NC, the Atlantic Coast, 40 miles north of Wilmington, NC. 200 miles south of Norfolk, VA. 110 miles east of Raleigh, NC. Home to 80,000Marines.

No church service with 1662 BCP in town. But am doing some thinking about it.

A salute to Aatych.

Email: reformationtoday@yahoo.com

Reformation said...

Additionally, beyond the Morning Prayer lections, 5 chapters for OT lection and 5 chapters for NT lection in Evening Prayer. 15 per day.

Upon the next re-read, will be thinking explicitly about the lack of courage, integrity, consistency, and theology we're getting from from sites of theological windbaggery, chaos, confusion, and charismatic enthusiasm.

I love what the English Reformer, John Philpott, said to London, Bonner.

During the discussion, Philpott affirms “My belief must not hang upon men’s sayings without the sure authority of God’s word, the which if any can shew me, I will be pliant to the same. Otherwise, I cannot go from my certain faith to that which is uncertain.”[3] Like the early church, rest and trust in the certain, clear and sure testimonies of the Law, Prophets, and Apostles.

Reformation said...

Additionally, beyond the Morning Prayer lections, 5 chapters for OT lection and 5 chapters for NT lection in Evening Prayer. 15 per day.

Upon the next re-read, will be thinking explicitly about the lack of courage, integrity, consistency, and theology we're getting from from sites of theological windbaggery, chaos, confusion, and charismatic enthusiasm.

I love what the English Reformer, John Philpott, said to London, Bonner.

During the discussion, Philpott affirms “My belief must not hang upon men’s sayings without the sure authority of God’s word, the which if any can shew me, I will be pliant to the same. Otherwise, I cannot go from my certain faith to that which is uncertain.” (1)Like the early church, rest and trust in the certain, clear and sure testimonies of the Law, Prophets, and Apostles.

Philpott, The Writings and Examinations of John Philpott (Parker Society Series), 135.

PS... Philpott was an unabashed and vigourous Calvinist. Bonner displays the usual rants in examination 6 and 7. A real railroad job on Philpott. He got roasted for his faith.

Michael+<>< said...

NOC: Christ's Anglican Fellowship
NOP: The Reverend Michael La Cagnina
Introduced 1662 BCP at suggestion of our Bishop, Robinson Cavalcanti, Bishop of Recife, Brazil
ECC. Body: ACNA, Gulf Atlantic Diocese
Loc: High Springs, FL
Email: To Pastor mlacagnina@windstream.net
Forms: MP & HC
Aids: 1940 & '82 Hymnals, Levas, & individual pieces under CCL License
OTHER: While we use the 1662 BCP, we have altered some of the sequence of the service which results in shortening the service while maintaining the theology.

David Austen said...

My friend the Rev'd James Johnson told me about your blog. Yes the 1662 Book of Common Prayer is still the official Prayer Book for the Church of England even though there are alternative liturgies in use. My name is the Reverend Robert Placer, a priest with the Protestant Episcopal Church USA, not the Episcopal Church. Our name is incorporated in the state of Florida. Our bishop is the Right Revrend Doctor Ian Anderson. Our standard prayer book is the 1928 American Edition of the Book of Common Prayer nevertheless our canons permit the use of the 1549 and 1662 Prayer Books. We have chosen the name "Protestant Episcopal Church" because we are branding our diocese as the continuation of the American Anglican Church organized in 1789. We do not ordain women to the three orders of ministry in obedience to Holy Scripture and the example set forth by our Lord Jesus Christ. We are attempting to correct the errors and abuses that are the reason for the failure of the Continuing Church in North America to become the true alternative for Episcopalians. We have two established congregations with a third on the way to join us. Bishop Anderson is working on a new diocesan web site but here is the web address for Resurrection Church that will give you some information about us: www.resurrectionpec.org I read your message that you are a house church under the leadership of laymen. Are you seeking to join an Anglican jurisdiction with the intention of planting a church in your community? My e-mail address is: thomascranmer@gmail.com
I shall look forward to your e-mail.

Reformation said...

Robert:

Your group, PECUSA, or TPEC, has been a revolving door for bishops and clergy. At least a dozen in 4-5years.

Your last Bishop to exit, Del Murray, stated there was "no leadership and no discipline."

You tolerated anti-Calvinism in your midst when I was there.

The Rev. Dr. Hubler (PhD, Oxford), a Reformed Anglican, as trustworthy as they come, who towers over all in the PECUSA, stated tersely that you folks were "interested in being Reformed."

What happened to www.reformer.org the old website?

Some of us really want a Reformed, Confessionally mature, e.g. Irish Articles of 1615, Lambeth Articles of 1595, to shape a new consensus oriented to Reformation insights and robust exegesis.

Idolizing the past tradition of the PECUSA is a non-starter.

Thanks, but no thanks.

1549 BCP? 1928 BCP?

Reformation said...

Correction to comment on Dr. Hubler, to wit, "were not interested in being a Reformed."

Knowing Dr. Hubler over many years, if he said, you can take that check to the bank and it won't bounce.

St. Amp said...

Hi. It's gotten to the point where I feel I'm being unreasonable to ask the Lord for a fellowship of believers in my area who try to worship together and minister to each other in a more or less Biblical manner. But I guess nothing is new under the sun. I have a question for y'all (especially Mr. Jordan) about an "end run" means to the end of getting a local sound assembly. With so many questionable divisions now flowing out of what was once a basic New Testament foundation, why not a simple local church that's unaffiliated. I've been to many "independent" evangelical and even somewhat reformed bodies. Those are far better than most any local "Episcopal" groups I've found. I don't believe in the succession of bishops, so that's not a hindrance to me. I like the doctrine as it plays out in the 1662 PB, so I'd use that as a calling card. In other words, I'd let visitors know that this pastor is in general agreement with how that PB and the 39 articles (and the WCF and GAFCON statements, for that matter) comment on the Word. You see where I'm going: this "Denver Fellowship" (let's call it)is what it is, without seeking the stamp of approval of others out of necessity. All wrong?

Michael+<>< said...

Dear St. Amp

While your search for a “perfect” assembly of believers has been unfruitful, you should not be discouraged, for in time, you will find that perfection, however it will NOT be on this side of the grave. Recall the many imperfections of the disciples when Jesus called them. It was not until after Pentecost that they finally began to see the revelations of Jesus; and even then they had failings, look at Peter’s disagreement with Paul regarding the spreading of the Gospel to Gentiles and whether Gentiles needed to become Jews BEFORE becoming Christians.

You will never find perfection in an assembly of Christian worshippers, and regardless of the pastor you choose to settle under, should you ever do so, you will find that he too is imperfect. What we are called to do is overlook the spec in our brother’s eye and work on removing the log in our own eye. Instead of looking for perfection, seek Jesus in a fellowship. You will find Him in various strengths in various people, for recall, Christ is in us and we in Him. Our call is to build up one another and not look for faults.

As for whether or not you believe in apostolic succession or in its validity, what you should accept is that we all work best when we are accountable to someone for our actions and performance. A strong, Biblical fellowship, regardless of its effectiveness, can easily go astray if the leader is not accountable to a higher authority, and that authority is not only God but also human authority. We have had many instances of fallen leadership that has no accountability. The Episcopal Church acts as a wholly independent body that has no accountability to the rest of the communion. This type of irresponsible activity is not limited to TEC, in times past we can see the excesses of successful TV evangelists, Jimmy Baker and Jimmy Swagert to name two, and there are many more. We can look also at the Roman church that went haywire with its sale of indulgences. My point is that any worshipping body can go astray if there is not structure for ensuring accountability.

I happen to have been a lay person that sought ordination at the age of 65, I am now 69 and leading a congregation of some 31 people. I am very comfortable being under the authority of a Bishop who has been elected from an assembly of my peers. Throughout my lay life, I have worked in several cities with mission churches to help build them up, but always under the authority of an ordained priest and bishop. When I joined these churches, they were not perfect and when I left them, they were still not perfect. However, while I was there, we all looked to working together to spread the Gospel in our own imperfect way, knowing that the Lord would use our imperfections to achieve His result. I think that is the best that we can expect and do in this lifetime. The key is to place our trust in the Lord and not in ourselves, work shoulder to shoulder in Love with our fellow Christians to spread the Gospel, and whenever we stumble seek forgiveness and move forward in His way.

I encourage you to get into fellowship, regardless of the denomination or non-denomination, regardless of its charismatic or anglo-catholic bent. The important thing is to be in fellowship in a body that teaches and embraces the Gospel of Jesus. Then you can work within that body to spread the Gospel of Jesus.

If you ever get to Florida, please come worship with us, we would love to have you join us in celebrating the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, our Messiah.

Blessings to you,
Michael La Cagnina, Rector
Christ’s Anglican Fellowship
High Springs, FL

Michael said...

I am a non-parochial cleryman who has been involved with a couple of continuing jurisdictions. I have recently been leading a quiet life using the 1662 BCP with Cranmer's original lectionary. In my last position I used the Shorter Catechism as a teaching tool. I'm glad to see there are some of us out there in the wasteland who consider themselves reformed Anglicans. (I am a WTS grad who studied under Philip Hughes of the C of E.) Have been recently rereading the Zurich Letters (Parker Society). Great Stuff! Best wishes to all. Michael

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